Coca-Cola and the Science of OJ with Speyer

Coca-Cola executives and managers are focusing on ambitious and long-term growth for the brand. Part of Coca-Cola’s strategy to increase their market share is to increase their presence in the juice submarket says expect Robert Speyer. However, producing Orange Juice (OJ) is a much more involved process. Coca-Cola is striving for taste and consistency yet their process is constantly affected by external conditions such as weather patterns, crop yields, and remaining cost competitive.

The external conditions are structured problems. If the OJ production process is constantly being affected by various external problems, there should be a protocol in place for each of these individual issues. For example, Coca-Cola should extend the shelving life of their OJ by putting more preservatives in their product explains Speyer. That way if the weather’s not cooperating or the there is a crop yield, the company can maintain their product flow.

Unstructured problems are problems that have never occurred before. They are usually not recurring. Because the issues are often complex, managers and executives should not delegate these issues as they usually do with structured problems. They should implement Utilitarian ethics so that they can quantify the risks, access them with a group of dedicated employees (more perspectives with more certainty), and have an effective quick execution. Making decisions with managers and executives from different departments can allow them to question each other so the decisions are not blinded (everyone speaks up) summarizes Robert Speyer. Additionally, understanding big data and hing an effective algorithmic process will contribute to the success of redirecting problems. If the company uses past data to guide their unstructured decisions, their unstructured decisions can be made with guidance and even more certainty.